More effective new anti-clotting drug

A new oral anti-clotting drug, rivaroxaban (Xarelto), is an effective, convenient and safer treatment for patients coping with deep-vein thrombosis (DVT). DVT, sometimes called “economy flight syndrome” as it is associated with immobilization during long flights, can migrate to the lungs and form life-threatening pulmonary embolisms.

Physicians prescribe well-known anti-coagulant medications, such as oral warfarin (Coumadin) and/or heparin injections to treat the condition.

According to two new studies published in New England Journal of Medicine, oral rivaroxaban is superior to enoxaparin and vitamin K agonist for treating the potentially life-threatening clots, most typically formed in the lower leg or thigh.

Patients with symptomatic deep-vein thrombosis have a recurrence rate of 2.1% while receiving rivaroxaban for a 12-month period compared to 3% when taking enoxaparin and a vitamin K antagonist for the same duration, the study found.

“Rivaroxiban is at least as effective as the older drug warfarin and seems safer. It is also far easier to use since it does not require blood testing to adjust the dose,” said Harry R Büller from the Academic Medical Center at the University of Amsterdam.

“This new treatment regimen of oral rivaroxaban can potentially make blood-clot therapy easier than the current standard treatment for both the patient and the physician with a single drug and simple fixed-dose approach,” he added.

10 Dry Skin Remedies

The best cleaning method for dry skin is soaking the face in lukewarm water for 10 minutes. It is better to avoid warm water to clean the face especially in winters. This is very useful dry skin treatment. Also for washing the face it’s better to use mineral water instead of tap water and see the result. 2. Almond Oil
Massage the face with almond oil or olive oil every night before going to bed. The oils can also be used to massage the other parts of the body. Good home remedy for dry skin.

3. Castor Oil
Dry skin remedy – In severe cases of dry skin castor oil or avocado oil is highly beneficial.

4. Aloe Vera
After bathing applying Aloe Vera gel is also effective. This is good dry skin remedy.

5. Avocado
Mash half an avocado and mix it with a few drops of fresh lime juice and spread this paste over the cleansed skin. Stay it for fifteen to twenty minutes. Wash the skin alternately both with cold and warm water. This is also effective home remedies for dry skin.

6. OAT Remedy
a. Make a mixture of cooked oatmeal and honey for moisturizing and cleaning the face. This is also one of the useful natural remedy for dry skin.
b. Before bathing add 5-6 drops of oat extract or lavender oil to the bathtub.

7. Banana
Mash a ripe banana and apply it on the face and neck. Leave it for sometime and then wash the face with lukewarm water. This is a best dry skin cure.

8. Grapeseed Oil
Massaging the skin with grapeseed oil is the best and effective method for dry skin.

9. Egg
Take the yolk of an egg and dab it on your face leave for 15 minutes. keep using this pack everyday till your face is clear

10. Exercise & Yoga
Regular exercise will improve the blood circulation and encourages blood flow providing nourishment to the skin.

Nutritious Diets
a. Fruits and vegetables that are rich in vitamin A and B should be included in the diet.
b. Omega 3 Fatty Acids – Eating oily fish like salmon which contains omega-3 fatty acids will help hydrating and nourishing skin.

Stroke Rate Rises for Patients With HIV Infection

Jan 24:  While the overall hospitalization rate for stroke has declined in recent years, the numbers have jumped dramatically for patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), suggesting they may be up to three times more likely to suffer a stroke than people uninfected by the virus that causes AIDS.艾滋病毒, 疾病, 保佑你, 健康检查, 艾滋病, 免疫, 免疫缺陷, 保护

In a paper published in the Jan. 19 online issue of Neurology, Bruce Ovbiagele, MD, professor of neurosciences at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Avindra Nath, MD, of Johns Hopkins University, reviewed a national dataset of all hospital patients primarily diagnosed with stroke between the years 1997 and 2006.

They found that the number of stroke diagnoses in the general population declined 7 percent during this time period (to 926,997 from 998,739) while stroke diagnoses among HIV-infected patients rose 67 percent (to 1,425 from 888). The rise in strokes among HIV patients was entirely driven by an increase in ischemic strokes, which are caused by impaired blood flow to the brain due to clots. Ischemic strokes are significantly more common than hemorrhagic strokes, which involve leakage of blood from the circulatory system into the brain.

Strokes can result in rapidly occurring, permanent loss of brain function due to severely reduced or interrupted blood supply to the brain. They are the third leading cause of death in the United States, with more than 143,579 fatalities annually, and the leading cause of serious, long-term disability.

“Generally speaking, strokes in patients with HIV are not common, so the rise is notable,” said Ovbiagele, who is also a staff physician in the VA San Diego Healthcare System. He noted that the time period studied coincides with the emergence and widespread use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for HIV patients. HAART has been notably successful in extending the lives of HIV/AIDS patients, but Ovbiagele said emerging data suggest that these drugs can be associated with metabolic complications linked to higher risk of stroke.

“The rise in HIV stroke rate may simply be because patients are living longer,” Ovbiagele said. “Stroke risk is highly correlated with increasing age. Almost three-quarters of strokes occur after the age of 65. Indeed, after 55, the risk doubles for each successive decade.”

However, among HIV patients the average age for a stroke was in the 50s and Ovbiagele said it has been previously shown that drugs used in HAART affect lipid and glucose levels, which are metabolic biomarkers associated with ischemic stroke risk.

Ovbiagele intends to pursue further studies to better examine the relationship between HIV drug treatment, metabolic complications and stroke risk.

“Patients on HAART will clearly need to remain on the drugs to extend their lives, but the challenge will be to clarify whether HAART therapy is an innocent bystander or a direct culprit in this process. Furthermore, it would be helpful to find out if rates of myocardial infarctions, more commonly known as heart attacks, are rising among HIV patients since they share similar underlying biological mechanisms to ischemic strokes.”